Archive for the ‘lomography’ Tag

Instant Photography

What is it about instant photography? Sure, there’s the instant gratification of having your image straightaway, but you get that with digital too. Is it the fact that it is a print rather than just an image on the screen, something physical and somehow more real? Maybe, all I really know for sure is that I love it.

 

Here are a few results from my recent instant photography fun. All are shot with either my Polaroid 340 Land Camera or my Fuji Instax 100, shooting Fuji FP100C and Instax Wide respectively. Any spots, scratches and the like on the images are the result of a tired, old scanner and not the cameras themselves.

 

The Polaroid 340 Land Camera is older than me, they only made them between 1969 and 1971 according to one website I have seen, but fully functional. Not sure I can say the same about me. It was a real bargain – my Mum found it in her loft and gave it to me for free. There’s one picture of me as a baby taken with a Polaroid in one of her family photo albums and I suspect this was the last image taken with it until I got hold of it. Amazingly, the original battery in it was still working!

 

The Instax 100 was, at the time of its release, described as one of the ugliest cameras ever made. Strangely Fujifilm seem to have been happy with this and have tried to make subsequent Instax Wide cameras even uglier! However, I don’t care how it looks – only about the pictures it takes, which are great!

 

I need to spend more time using these two cameras, I can’t help but smile every time I do. Now, if only I could find a place to get the film packs cheap . . .16907828622_38259e9ab1_o 16286706064_d6beb59441_o 16289073673_99cbbb7737_o 16701765307_15f5f89cbd_o 16907823812_d7daece368_o

New use for old glass

You are on a budget so, much though you might love to, you can’t buy all the new lenses you’d like. Sure the new 24mm Sigma lens looks cool but you have enough bank loans already and one for a camera lens might just break you – what do you do? Simple, use old lenses.

Chances are that if you are an obsessive budget photographer you probably already have an old film SLR or rangefinder and a collection of lenses. If not, go out and get one, they can be had very cheap. My own film SLR a is a Zenit 122 with an M42 mount, you can pick up M42 mount cameras for next to nothing and there are hundreds of lenses out there. I’ve got a Hanimex MC Auto 28mm, a Helios 44-4 58mm and a Jupiter 37A 135mm – all very cheap.

Of course the first use you should put all of this kit to is film photography! So go ahead, I’ll wait . . . still shooting? Ok, come back when you are done . . . good to go? Great.

Now for the other use you can put the lenses to, making your digital photography more interesting. Now, I have a Nikon D70 SLR but the focus screen is terrible for manual focusing – seriously, it is light years behind the Zenit for this. Instead I have a Samsung NX100 (bought cheap on eBay as it had no lens with it) that has a focus peeping (zoom) feature that makes manual focus a hundred times easier. It is possible to get better focusing screens fitted to modern DSLRs but for the price you can probably get different camera that will do better. Don’t get me wrong, I still love my D70 but it is only going to be used with autofocus lenses from now on.

But how can you use an ancient M42 mount lens on a fancy-shmancy digital camera-thingy? I hear you ask. Well by using an adapter of course! Some lovely people make adapters that allow the mounting of old lenses on new cameras, isn’t that nice of them? Of course they do charge for them, but as I got mine for £4, including postage, they don’t charge much.

Old film lenses are meant for what is now called ‘full frame’ when talking about sensor sizes so (depending on your sensor) you may have to do some recalculating to work out what the crop factor does to the focal length. To be honest, this doesn’t really matter all that much. Look at the image on the screen and you will soon get used to what each lens gives you.

If you are obsessive about your images being pin-sharp at all times then old lenses may disappoint you unless you use the smallest apertures at all times. Then again if you are obsessive about pin-sharp images you should probably save all you can and go for the newest and most expensive lenses. However, old lenses have a remarkable thing many modern lenses lack – character. If you use the same colour setting on your camera each lens will render the colours differently, there will be differences in the levels of contrast when shooting black and white. Also, as your old lenses are far more likely to be prime lenses than zooms the chances are they will have much wider apertures than your modern lenses. My two Nikon zooms have minimum apertures between 3.5 and 5.6 depending on the focal length (I also have the 50mm 1.8 but it is the only modern prime I own), my M42 lenses go from 2 to 3.5 as a minimum. Even at 3.5 there is a world of difference in terms of depth of field and bokeh.

Sometimes I am looking for a pin sharp image so I use my D70 and modern glass, it does the job great. Sometimes I am looking for something different though, and that is what old glass offers – some of the quirkiness of film photography with the convenience of digital.

http://www.flickr.com/archerctb

We come to praise the Lomo LCA, not to bury him . . .

Yes, the title of this post is a little silly but I like it so there.

How is it that I like the Lomo LCA so much? I often find a lot of the whole lomography craze to be about people taking bad photographs and passing them off as art. I cannot afford most of what the Lomography Society sell (although I do covet a lot of it). But I love my LCA.

Bought for a low, low price on eBay because of a shutter issue, fixed with new batteries and a bit of poking around with a biro – somehow it works for me. As a small electronic item made in the Soviet Union in the 1980’s it probably shouldn’t even be working anymore but it does – and it often gets great images. I know the lens is supposed to be soft but I have never really noticed that, most of my images seem to come out of it pretty well. The ones that don’t are much more likely to be down to user error than the camera.

It is a 35mm point and shoot camera for those unitiated into it’s marvels, there are some manual settings for the aperture but the meter works so well I rarely bother with them. You can manually adjust the focus distance too, though I am not great at judging the distances based on the results when I try this. It fits well in your hand and is simple to use, at least for those of us who grew up using a film camera.

Somehow this simpole camera is my camera of choice, I almost always have it on me and love using it. Sure, I have better quality film and digital cameras – but this is the one I always come back to. Why? I don’t know, it just has some sort of magic.

http://www.flickr.com/archerctb